Oct 242013
 

pomThere is more to Fall than pumpkins and Halloween. It’s pomegranate season baby! Typically, pomegranates are in season from September through January and in some cases lasting through February. Taking center stage not only for their taste but for their magnificent health properties, here’s a little pomegranate 101.

Pomegranates are one of the oldest known, nutrient dense fruits respected today for their impressive source of anti-oxidants. Antioxidants, found in fruits, nuts and vegetables, counteract the damaging effects of oxidation to the body. Like an apple turns brown, cars turn to rust or sunspots/age spots appear on your skin, oxidation is the direct results of free radical damage caused by sun, smoke, pollution, stress, chemicals, etc. The U.S. Department of Agriculture ranks pomegranate juice as the 5th strongest antioxidant behind baking chocolate (yum), elderberry, Red Delicious apples and Granny Smith apples. Additionally, it has been said that pomegranates may have even more antioxidant power than cranberry juice or green tea!

Whether it’s cooking, baking, juicing, making smoothies or adult beverages, let’s break open these bad boys!

First things first. Make sure you’re not wearing anything that you care about as the juice from this ninja fruit will stain your clothes. It’ll also stain your cutting board too, so be sure to use parchment paper. With a chef’s knife, divide the fruit into two halves.

Pomegranate 101

If you’re a first timer…you will be amazed at the texture inside and as the seeds are perfectly rested in the “membrane” of the fruit itself.

Pomegranate 101

To ensure that there are no seeds left behind, cut the halves again so that you now have quarters. This will make it easier for you to remove the seeds with as little to no mess as possible.

Pomegranate 101

Now, this step is important. Using a small to medium sized mixing bowl, fill it with cool water to assist you with the removal process.

Pomegranate 101

Use your fingers to pry away the seeds from the membranes. The seeds will sink to the bottom of the water while pieces of membrane will float to the top, making it easier for you to extract the seeds. Note: it may be best for you to pry open the pomegranate and remove the seeds underwater. I find this to be helpful. 

Pomegranate 101

Once you are done removing the seeds by hand, strain the water and remove any remaining membrane particles. Place into a serving bowl and enjoy their crunchy, cool, goodness right away! Or, add a cup into a blender or juicer. You can also freeze them for future recipes.

Pomegranate 101

 More recipes to come. But for now, ENJOY!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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